What is a Bankart and Reverse Bankart Tear?

Reverse Bankart and Plication Repair

Surgery performed by Dr. Chams

Your labrum is anatomically divided into several compartments including anterior (bankart) and posterior (reverse bankart).

Bankart Lesions

Bankart lesions occur to the anterior portion of the labrum. Picture the labrum as a clock, bankart lesions are from the 2 o’clock to 6 o’clock position. This results when the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) translates anterior (forward) out or off the socket (glenoid) causing the fibrous tissue (labrum) to tear. Occasional a forceful subluxation or dislocation can cause on osseous bankart. This is a tear of the anterior labrum and fracture of the glenoid. Symptoms can include pain throughout the shoulder, feelings of instability, popping and grinding. With this type of injury activities, overhead such as throwing a ball or reaching to your side can be problematic.

Reverse Bankart

Reverse bankart lesions occur to the posterior portion of the labrum. Picture the labrum as a clock, reverse bankart lesions are from the 6 o’clock to 11 o’clock position. This results when the head of the upper arm bone (humerus) translates posterior (backward) out or off the socket (glenoid) causing the fibrous tissue (labrum) to tear. Symptoms can include pain throughout the shoulder, feelings of instability, popping and grinding. This type of injury can occur with activities such as performing a bench press, stiff arm blocking in football and lacrosse or a motor vehicle accident while holding onto the steering wheel. Symptoms can range from decreased range of motion, pain, and instability, catching, popping and grinding. These symptoms usually occur with activities overhead or away from your chest.

Diagnosis

Diagnosis can be determined